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Pattern insight + emergence

Delving beneath the surface of life at Patternity Studio

SPACE

Saturn’s seasons can be determined by the appearance of it’s rings. On Earth, the solstice is the time when the Earth’s spin axis tilts directly toward the Sun. Since Saturn’s grand rings orbit along the planet’s equator, these rings appear most prominent – when viewed from the direction of the Sun – when the Saturn’s spin axis points toward the Sun. Conversely, when Saturn’s spin axis points to the side, an equinox occurs and the edge-on rings are hard to see. In the featured montage, images of Saturn over the past 11 years have been superposed to show the giant planet passing from southern summer toward northern summer. Although Saturn will only reach its northern summer solstice in 2017 May, the image of Saturn most analogous to today’s Earth solstice is the bottommost one…

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Saturn stands out in our minds as the planet with an extraordinary form: striped rings extending over 175 000 miles are suspended around the gaseous giant.

But since Galileo discovered them in 1610, the origin and purpose of the rings still remains a mystery: we don’t even know how many of them there are. Scientists believe that through answering these questions we will learn more about our solar system…

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“We are in the midst of a global crisis of perspective. We have forgotten the undeniable truth that every living thing is connected.”

To coincide with International Earth Day, PLANETARY have released a new film exploring Earth and our perspectives of it…

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Every year on 12th April, the world unites to celebrate the day in 1961 when the first human entered space; Yuri Gagarin was a Russian cosmonaut whose Vostok Spacecraft orbited the Earth. Since then countless expeditions and investigations into the outer reaches of our atmosphere and beyond have fuelled human innovation and curiosity. Share in PATTERNITY’s continuing fascination with space exploration…

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A London exhibition opening this week will explore the patterns found inside iron meteorites. Artist duo Casey Moore and Claire Alexander will exhibit macro photographs of space debris from the Natural History Museum in London and the Museum of Auckland, some of which have been worked into with Alexander’s intricate drawings…

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Today on the 19th Februrary, as we celebrate the Lunar New Year – The Year of the Goat– we take a look at NASA’s compelling new imagery of the dark side of the moon, the side which cannot be seen from Earth. The lesser-known face features one of the largest craters in the solar system, the South-Pole Aitken Basin, which is over 8 miles deep and an impressive 1,6000 miles wide.

The video uses data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to reveal the magnificent landscape…

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Geological Map of Part of the Appennine-Hadley Region of the Moon. Scale: 1:50,000. Here, large areas of  basalt and mountain debris are highlighted. The Apennine Mountains form a 15,000 cliff that rises higher above the Hadley plain than the Himalayan front above the plains of India and Nepal and is the region where Apollo 15 landed in 1971. Source: U.S Geological Survey

Apollo 14′s voyage to the moon, the third in NASA’s history, carried some more earthly cargo. Astronaut Stuart Roosa, who used to work at the US. Forest Service, stowed hundreds of seeds from five different trees : Loblolly Pine, Sycamore, Sweetgum, Redwood, and Douglas Fir, in an experiment to measure the effects of weightlessness and the conditions of space on germinating life…

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NASA’s New Horizions expedition, launched over nine years ago, is due to reach its goal as it nears the dwarf planet Pluto. Completing the longest journey of any spacecraft – travelling over 7.5 billion kilometers – the New Horizons Spacecraft will explore the icy outer edge of our solar system as it passes by Pluto, teaching us more about the infinite universe that we share and the origins of our very own planet.…

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Humanity has been pondering the ways in which we might communicate with life on other planets for centuries, and numerous attempts have been made to transmit messages and cultural artefacts into space in the hope they might one day be picked by an alien species. Given the possibility that non-human sentient lifeforms would have a completely different means of communicating and understanding the universe, one of the biggest challenges is determining what form the message should take if it is to convey, at very least, the idea that it originates from an intelligent species.

Whatever form it does take, pattern is likely to be at the heart of it. PATTERNITY is founded on the belief that pattern functions as a universal language – and NASA has a similar perspective. Earlier this year, the space agency released a book offering and in-depth but accessibly intriguing reflection on the possible modes of extra-terrestrial communication, considering both how mankind might express itself in order to be understood, and how we should prime our own models of interpretation to recognise and decode any messages that might be being directed towards us…

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In celebration of World Space Week, PATTERNITY looks to the skies, pairing inspiring intergalactic imagery with some of the ideas and reflections that space has inspired here on Earth. Like glancing out of a window at the world outside, our glimpses at the patterns of the cosmos are a humbling and eye-opening reminders of the position our world occupies in the vastness of space, and its fragility and dependence upon the wider universe…

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CELEBRATING SPACE WEEK ‘Materials on International Space Station Experiment-8.’ July 12, 2011 The small circles are test beds for materials and computing elements attached to the outside of the ISS. These elements are being evaluated for the effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet, direct sunlight, radiation, and the extremes of heat and cold. Researchers hope the results will provide a better understanding of the durability of various materials and computing elements when they are exposed to the rigours of space environments and hope to incorporate what is learned into the design of future spacecraft. Photo and Text: NASA

NASA Astronaut Donald Pettit has often been called the guru of space photography. Working on the ISS for over ten years, Pettit has captured some of the most magnificent images of our home, earth, and the galaxy beyond; many which force us to ask questions about our environment and seek further innovation and exploration. With the primary scientific intention of collecting data from the imagery, surveying the globe and the universe, he also recognises the intrinsic beauty and uniqueness of his work.

“Just the idea that there is value in the pictures that transcends their imagery — the fact that a human being thought that it was worthwhile to take a picture at this point on Earth — that information becomes an interesting data set”

Read more about the technicalities and practice of photography in space at Time Magazine here…

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Amongst the glimmering patchwork of stars, scientists have discovered an earth-sized diamond in space. Leftover from a cooled white dwarf, the chunk of carbon was found due to its interference with the patterns of lightwaves from surrounding stars. Read more about this enormous jewel at the National Geographic.

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The 12th April 1961 marked the first time that a human entered space: Yuri Gagarin was a Russian cosmonaut whose Vostok Spacecraft orbited the Earth.

Here PATTERNITY pairs magnificent images showing human Space endeavours and the progress made since that first venture into the unknown, with things much more rooted to terra firma; reminding us of the vastness of space, and the interconnected nature of the whole Universe…

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