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Pattern insight + emergence

Delving beneath the surface of life at Patternity Studio

SCIENCE

The patterns of nature frequently inspire innovations in man-made technology. A recent example is the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s attempt to create a light-responsive camouflage material mimicking the skin of an octopus.

Using cells called chromatophores, cephalopods are able to alter their colour, luminosity, texture and pattern in response to changes in their environment. A layer of photosensitive skin cells can detect shifts in the light around them, allowing the animals to mimic the patterns of the ocean floor as they travel across it.

Inspired by the ability of nature to create and respond to pattern, a team of marine biologists and materials scientists has come together to create a flexible paper-thin sheet containing artificial chromatophores, which changes its pattern in response to ambient light and temperature. Currently, it is limited to producing ‘triangles, arrays of dots and random patterns’ in black and white, but the invention marks a first step towards materials that create patterns in response to those around them…

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Engineers at the University of New Mexico have developed a means of changing hair colour through the use of pattern alone. The technology is based upon the phenomenon of structural colour, whereby the spectrum of light absorbed or reflected by an object – and therefore its perceived colour – is determined by the pattern of microscopic ridges on its surface…

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A Swedish student has come up with a payment method that involves a simple biometric scan of the hand. The vein-scanning technology makes use of everyone’s unique pattern of veins as a way to make a payment. Fredrik Leifland’s innovative idea aims to reduce identity fraud, and speed up the payment process. Read more about this pattern innovation here.

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Amongst the glimmering patchwork of stars, scientists have discovered an earth-sized diamond in space. Leftover from a cooled white dwarf, the chunk of carbon was found due to its interference with the patterns of lightwaves from surrounding stars. Read more about this enormous jewel at the National Geographic.

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‘Discovery Wall’ incorporates imagery of pioneering research by the biomedical research centre at The Weill Cornell Medical College on LED dots. Passers by see the dots come together to create a larger pattern, but upon closer inspection the installation allows viewers to explore some of the medical textures and structures up close. Created by British creative agencies Squint/Opera and Hirsch&Mann, the ever changing installation transforms the centre and offers visitors a chance to peer into the surreal finds of the research centre.

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It’s easy to forget that the existence of most of the fruit and vegetables that we find on our plates relies on the humble honeybee. Increasingly under threat from both natural and man made enemies, honeybees are kept under the watchful eye of beekeepers across the country. PATTERNITY spoke to Jane Moseley of the British Bee Keeping Association to find out more about why these bees are so vital, and the changes that human patterns of behaviour are creating that threaten their existence…

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Much of the human experience is created through unseen actions and reactions happening constantly in our brain. As part of Mental Health Awareness Week, PATTERNITY takes a look at the patterns inside the brain that are brought to life by innovating imaging technologies, helping scientists and experts come up with treatments and strategies for people living with mental health illnesses and problems with the functionality of the brain.

We draw attention to the intricacy of the organ that drives our conscious and the universality of the patterns of its structure and make-up…

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The 12th April 1961 marked the first time that a human entered space: Yuri Gagarin was a Russian cosmonaut whose Vostok Spacecraft orbited the Earth.

Here PATTERNITY pairs magnificent images showing human Space endeavours and the progress made since that first venture into the unknown, with things much more rooted to terra firma; reminding us of the vastness of space, and the interconnected nature of the whole Universe…

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