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Pattern insight + emergence

Delving beneath the surface of life at Patternity Studio

PATTERN INNOVATION

Moorfields Eye Hospital in London makes 1,400 customised, detailed prosthetic eyes every year, each with a unique iris pattern matched to the individual.
Thousands of people annually lose eyes to disease and accidents, and the team carry out a specialised process of casting and shaping and painting prosthetic eyes…

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The shapes of the city are often translated into printed and surface elements of fashion garments, such as Fendi’s AW15 collection or even PATTERNITY’s very own Chinti + Parker collaboration. Graduate designer Yuri Pardi’s ‘Monument’ collection has taken this one step further by creating pieces that take on the forms of the city, referencing the sculptural geometry of buildings…

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It’s the last chance to experience artist-composer Ryoji Ikeda’s installation Supersymmetry at The Vinyl Factory in London. Ikeda has drawn upon his experiences as artist in resident with CERN, who have been researching the idea of ‘supersymmetry’: a theoretical mathematical model that helps explain why particles have mass.

Mixing data projections and moving representations of particles, Ikeda visualises unseen patterns at an atomic level, immersing visitors in a visceral, multi-sensory experience that begins to unpick some of the bigger questions in mathematics and physics…

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Master mathematician and origamist Robert Lang shares the underlying principles of the art paper folding in this TED talk, showing that by exploring mathematics through visual forms, new understanding and discoveries can be made.
By uncovering the different crease patterns, Lang highlights the implications of origami in areas like product design, with folded designs being utilised in airbags and valve stents…

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The transformative effects of the sun on leather have been exploited by designer Nendo in a new range of products. Tanning oil or sunscreen is applied in an invisible pattern on the surface of the leather objects. At first, the product appears to be plain leather, but with use and exposure to sunlight, the pattern gradually begins to reveal itself. Nendo said “We wanted it to be a design that would highlight the beauty of leather over time”…

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Textile designs were transformed into sweet treats when multi-disciplinary designers Studiolav translated Haizhen Wang’s collection into biscuits. Simple stamping techniques were used to transfer the patterns from fabric to dough…

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As the world gathers for EXPO 2015 in Milan, the UK has unveiled its magnificent Pavilion, inspired by the humble honey bee: The Hive. The structure aims to bring attention to the plight of the bee, across Britain and the world. Visitors to the Pavilion will be immersed in the world of bees, from orchards of British fruit trees, to winding pathways representing the famous ‘bee dance’, and audiovisual receptors will even respond to data from real life hives, creating a sensory representation of an apiary…

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A British designer has crafted a way of growing chairs. Gavin Munro moulds young trees around plastic shapes, forcing the branches and stalks into functional pieces – intertwined growths form backs and seats, where junctions and trunks form legs and arms…

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Every year on 12th April, the world unites to celebrate the day in 1961 when the first human entered space; Yuri Gagarin was a Russian cosmonaut whose Vostok Spacecraft orbited the Earth. Since then countless expeditions and investigations into the outer reaches of our atmosphere and beyond have fuelled human innovation and curiosity. Share in PATTERNITY’s continuing fascination with space exploration…

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Whale songs have been interpreted by researchers, who found that the large mammal’s communications followed recognisable patterns and formula – much like human language. Scientist Roger Payne and researcher Scott McVay were able to create a new form of notation from the sonographs of the underwater tunes, in turn highlighting the reoccurring sounds and rhythms of their calls. Further research by scientists since has even uncovered rhymes and different whale dialects…

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After the buzz and furore of the AW15 Fashion shows, some designers leave a lasting impression. Anrealage’s presentation in Paris was an intriguing show of light and dark, with the designer employing a spotlight motif in many of his futuristic garments. This was explored in the physical show too, with searching lights crawling over the designs, revealing their forms and patterns. Anrealage is known for his innovative exploration of fabric and pattern, and this show was no exception, allowing the viewers to examine on the graphic patterns and intriguing materials of the latest pieces. The presentation is a must watch…

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Scientists have discovered that bats use the patterns created by polarised sunlight to navigate. Polarised light occurs when the Sun’s light waves are scattered as they come into contact with the Earth’s atmosphere – the variance of the scattering is caused by various atmospheric and geographical conditions.

The mouse eared bats studied are the first mammals that have been observed as seeing polarised light, though many insects, birds and reptiles have the ability to see the polarised spectrum.
This fascinating method highlights the variety and ingenuity of nature, and that there are many unseen things at work in the world around us…

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The Soundweaving Project took traditional Hungarian embroidery patterns and transformed them into musical scores using a custom music box. Embroidered shirts and pillows from the Transylvanian Bukovina, and from Kalotaszeg and Hungary served as a basis for the patterns which were then laser-punched into cards and fed through the musical machine…

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A mathematician and scientist has described how “brain waves pattern themselves after the rhythms of nature”. Jack Cowan has undertaken research that highlights the similarities in the way that the brain behaves and reacts and the reactions of everyday molecules. His latest findings show that the same mathematical tools physicists use to describe the behaviour of subatomic particles and the dynamics of liquids and solids can now be applied to understanding how the brain generates its various rhythms.
Cowan has also investigated other patterns in the brain, beginning to explain visual hallucinations and how the visual cortex obtained its stripy appearance.

Learn more about Jack Cowan’s research and the patterns that reoccur throughout the living world…

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As a surface dries or comes under stress, seemingly abstract formations of wrinkles occur. Researchers at MIT have come up with a mathematical equation that can predict the patterns these natural contours will take across curved surfaces.

“If you look at skin, there’s a harder layer of tissue, and underneath is a softer layer, and you see these wrinkling patterns that make fingerprints,” says Jörn Dunkel, an assistant professor of mathematics at MIT. “Could you, in principle, predict these patterns? It’s a complicated system, but there seems to be something generic going on, because you see very similar patterns over a huge range of scales.”

Scientists are now able to forecast how varying forces and shapes of surfaces determine the shape of the wrinkles – which range from regular hexagon like formations to swirling labyrinths.

Find out more about their wrinkle based research…

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