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Pattern insight + emergence

Delving beneath the surface of life at Patternity Studio

PATTERN EXPLORATION

Saturn’s seasons can be determined by the appearance of it’s rings. On Earth, the solstice is the time when the Earth’s spin axis tilts directly toward the Sun. Since Saturn’s grand rings orbit along the planet’s equator, these rings appear most prominent – when viewed from the direction of the Sun – when the Saturn’s spin axis points toward the Sun. Conversely, when Saturn’s spin axis points to the side, an equinox occurs and the edge-on rings are hard to see. In the featured montage, images of Saturn over the past 11 years have been superposed to show the giant planet passing from southern summer toward northern summer. Although Saturn will only reach its northern summer solstice in 2017 May, the image of Saturn most analogous to today’s Earth solstice is the bottommost one…

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“We live in a world that follows a fixed idea of time, a standard synchronized time held in place by time zones, clocks, and calendars. Instagram users reveal a different idea of time, a richly textured irregular time in which the setting sun and end of the day for one individual is the beginning of the day for another, a never-ending loop.”

All Our Suns is a map visualization of photos tagged #sunset and #sunrise uploaded to Instagram in the past 24 hours and updated in real-time. While Instagram users upload photos of the sunset within 4 hours of the sun setting, many Instagram users wait until the end of the day to reminiscence about the sunrise…

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Using scientific investigation techniques, artist duo Coral Morphographic capture coral in all of its glory from their studio and the waters surrounding their local area in Miami.

Showcasing the stunning organisms using time lapse techniques, Coral Morphographic prove that “The coral as an organism, as a symbol, is the perfect hybrid of art and science.”…

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Saturn stands out in our minds as the planet with an extraordinary form: striped rings extending over 175 000 miles are suspended around the gaseous giant.

But since Galileo discovered them in 1610, the origin and purpose of the rings still remains a mystery: we don’t even know how many of them there are. Scientists believe that through answering these questions we will learn more about our solar system…

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Edward Burtynsky’s magnificent photography has been providing us with a new perspective of our planet, and drawing attention to the impact that we humans are having on the environments in which we dwell.

Burtynsky’s latest project Watermark draws attention to our inextricable relationship with water…

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The 1980 Moscow Olympics was surrounded by controversy when America boycotted. However, the closing ceremony of the Russian Games was no less a spectacle, with impressive towering human sculptures and synchronised performances that wowed the crowd…

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Every year on 12th April, the world unites to celebrate the day in 1961 when the first human entered space; Yuri Gagarin was a Russian cosmonaut whose Vostok Spacecraft orbited the Earth. Since then countless expeditions and investigations into the outer reaches of our atmosphere and beyond have fuelled human innovation and curiosity. Share in PATTERNITY’s continuing fascination with space exploration…

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Marcus Lyon captured the settlements and structures of human travel and recreation in his aerial photography studies.

Lyon states “Timeout explores mass behaviours in a world where the search for safety and shelter has taken on a secondary role. As the billion planet dwellers that no longer need to satisfy their basic needs search for meaning they turn to another human instinct: exploration. Indeed, as our desire for escape intensifies, we unleash an unstoppable quest for release through consumption and adventure. Whether through budget air tourism, industrial food production or the mega rich’s super yachts, a systemically significant part of the human race defines its modern existence through endeavouring to conquer the natural rhythms of the earth through recreation and travel.”…

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The London Underground was captured from unique perspectives by photographer Huw Penson, who used kaleidoscope and mirroring techniques to present the transport network in a new way.

The aim of the project was to highlight the ‘strange surroundings most of us walk through everyday’, presenting them from an altered point of view. The spaces and textures in the piece create almost science-fictional scenes, elevating the mundane to the magnificent…

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A London exhibition opening this week will explore the patterns found inside iron meteorites. Artist duo Casey Moore and Claire Alexander will exhibit macro photographs of space debris from the Natural History Museum in London and the Museum of Auckland, some of which have been worked into with Alexander’s intricate drawings…

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Dramatic landscapes in the sky were documented by Jakob Wagner, who flew over the Caribbean and Mediterranean Seas, to capture the dream-like spaces.

The different cloud formations vary depending on climate: some are spiralling fractal shapes where others crack and blister across the horizon, highlighting the uniqueness and ever-changing beauty of the world above our heads…

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Today on the 19th Februrary, as we celebrate the Lunar New Year – The Year of the Goat– we take a look at NASA’s compelling new imagery of the dark side of the moon, the side which cannot be seen from Earth. The lesser-known face features one of the largest craters in the solar system, the South-Pole Aitken Basin, which is over 8 miles deep and an impressive 1,6000 miles wide.

The video uses data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to reveal the magnificent landscape…

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Geological Map of Part of the Appennine-Hadley Region of the Moon. Scale: 1:50,000. Here, large areas of  basalt and mountain debris are highlighted. The Apennine Mountains form a 15,000 cliff that rises higher above the Hadley plain than the Himalayan front above the plains of India and Nepal and is the region where Apollo 15 landed in 1971. Source: U.S Geological Survey

Apollo 14′s voyage to the moon, the third in NASA’s history, carried some more earthly cargo. Astronaut Stuart Roosa, who used to work at the US. Forest Service, stowed hundreds of seeds from five different trees : Loblolly Pine, Sycamore, Sweetgum, Redwood, and Douglas Fir, in an experiment to measure the effects of weightlessness and the conditions of space on germinating life…

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NASA’s New Horizions expedition, launched over nine years ago, is due to reach its goal as it nears the dwarf planet Pluto. Completing the longest journey of any spacecraft – travelling over 7.5 billion kilometers – the New Horizons Spacecraft will explore the icy outer edge of our solar system as it passes by Pluto, teaching us more about the infinite universe that we share and the origins of our very own planet.…

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