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Pattern insight + emergence

Delving beneath the surface of life at Patternity Studio

ART

“Our closets are treasure troves of memories, and, as every garment is a reminder of moments in my past, every painting of these fabric patterns serves as a memento.”

Artist Jennifer Faist explores the textural qualities of fabric through her monochromatic paintings, which zoom in on the patterned textiles of her and her friends clothing…

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It’s the last chance to experience artist-composer Ryoji Ikeda’s installation Supersymmetry at The Vinyl Factory in London. Ikeda has drawn upon his experiences as artist in resident with CERN, who have been researching the idea of ‘supersymmetry’: a theoretical mathematical model that helps explain why particles have mass.

Mixing data projections and moving representations of particles, Ikeda visualises unseen patterns at an atomic level, immersing visitors in a visceral, multi-sensory experience that begins to unpick some of the bigger questions in mathematics and physics…

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Master mathematician and origamist Robert Lang shares the underlying principles of the art paper folding in this TED talk, showing that by exploring mathematics through visual forms, new understanding and discoveries can be made.
By uncovering the different crease patterns, Lang highlights the implications of origami in areas like product design, with folded designs being utilised in airbags and valve stents…

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Using scientific investigation techniques, artist duo Coral Morphographic capture coral in all of its glory from their studio and the waters surrounding their local area in Miami.

Showcasing the stunning organisms using time lapse techniques, Coral Morphographic prove that “The coral as an organism, as a symbol, is the perfect hybrid of art and science.”…

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Iconic artist and pattern pioneer Yayoi Kusama is currently exhibiting at David Zwirner Gallery in New York, bringing together her trademark spotted pieces in Give Me Love.

The exhibition includes dotted pumpkins and bold canvasses, as well as a domestic space forming one of Kusama’s ‘Obliteration Rooms’ which interprets her ongoing struggle with anxiety…

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Visual artist Dan Vallins has deconstructed Ose’s latest release ‘Verb’, taking each element of the sonic palette and representing them through a series of overlapping animations of striking forms and patterns. Graphic shapes appear and move against a backdrop of moire stripes, with monochrome blocks warping into RGB at the edges as Vallins explores the visual glitches of the screen medium…

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Today we celebrate the birthday of the one of the original Op-Artists Victor Vasarley. Hungarian-French painter Vasarely developed a striking style employing simple geometric lines and shapes to create illusionary effects – which at the time were revolutionary – and went on to influence a whole era of graphic style…

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Humanity has been pondering the ways in which we might communicate with life on other planets for centuries, and numerous attempts have been made to transmit messages and cultural artefacts into space in the hope they might one day be picked by an alien species. Given the possibility that non-human sentient lifeforms would have a completely different means of communicating and understanding the universe, one of the biggest challenges is determining what form the message should take if it is to convey, at very least, the idea that it originates from an intelligent species.

Whatever form it does take, pattern is likely to be at the heart of it. PATTERNITY is founded on the belief that pattern functions as a universal language – and NASA has a similar perspective. Earlier this year, the space agency released a book offering and in-depth but accessibly intriguing reflection on the possible modes of extra-terrestrial communication, considering both how mankind might express itself in order to be understood, and how we should prime our own models of interpretation to recognise and decode any messages that might be being directed towards us…

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Artist Ryoki Ikenda has been turning the famous billboard of New York’s Time Square into colossal glitchy test patterns for three minutes before midnight during the month of October. The ‘ode to binary and barcodes’ transforms the usually bright, consumerist centre into a monochrome optical treat. To accompany the piece, the artist released a press release:  “00110110 01100001 01100011 01100011 01100100 01100001 01100101 00110001 00110011 01100101 01100110 01100110 00110111 01101001 00110011 01101100 00111001 01101110 00110100 01101111 00110100 01110001 01110010 01110010 00110100 01110011 00111000 01110100 00110001 00110010 01110110 01111000.” Ryoki Ikenda

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Pattern is an essential tool in the process of data visualisation, called upon to turn abstract statistics into the concrete and comprehensible. At the Tower of London, ceramicist Paul Cummins and set designer Tom Piper are creating an ongoing sculptural installation that makes use of pattern not only as an aesthetic expression of data, but also as a poignant First World War memorial artwork…

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French artist Laurent Gongora created an installation to intervene with the flow of a waterfall. Gongora attached 24 metal folds to the rock face of the Cascade de Vaucoux in France’s mountainous region Massif Central, also incorporating bars under each peak so that any birds or wildlife could take shelter…

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As we celebrate World Population Day, we look at David Oliete’s documentation the building of the Castells- human towers traditional to Catalonia, Spain. Often consisting of over 500 men standing ten men high, the tradition was placed UNESCO’s list of ‘Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity’ in 2010.

The event encourages teamwork and collaboration of hundreds of people for one common goal, testing the limits of the human body as different teams compete to build the highest tower. Each group uses a unique pattern to create the best structure, and whilst competition is rife, the teams in some cases come together to help form safety nets for each other’s human constructions, highlighting the unity instilled by this tradition

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Famed for his contribution to Pop Art in the sixties, Ed Ruscha is known also for capturing moments and environments of the everyday. His photographic work in particular explores objects and incidences of the mundane; Ruscha became fascinated with swimming pools, gas stations and parking lots after noticing them around LA where he lived and worked.

He was offered a ride in a helicopter over the city and captured parking lots from above:

“Seeing the topside of something instead of necessarily looking directly on [with] baseline perspective, looking over the top of something allows for [more of a] view, to do with perspective. [Different] things diminish and come into the foreground”….

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